Alcohol Use by Aboriginal Persons Living with HIV/AIDS

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FUND: Canadian Insitutes of Health Research, Insitute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health

PARTNER: Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network

MEMBERS: Hugh Dale-Harris, Colleen Dell, John Egan, David Lee, Renee Masching, Amy McGee, Nancy Gros-Louis McHugh, Tracey Prentice, Elder Cliff Thomas, Lyanna Storm

  CAAN Team

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AIM: This study supports the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network’s (CAAN’s) research agenda which includes exploring health service delivery merits to Aboriginal people with HIV/AIDS (APHAs), and in this case, those who use alcohol or are perceived to be using alcohol. This study explores the association between alcohol use and access to services from the perspectives of APHAs and service providers using a mixed methodology approach. The interrelated objectives are: (1) To determine the impact of alcohol use and/or perception of alcohol use on access to services by Aboriginal persons living with HIV/AIDS; (2) To document the extent to which service needs are being enhanced or compromised for APHAs who use alcohol or are perceived to be using alcohol; (3) To identify and discuss deficiencies in the provisions of services in the context of substance use; and (4) To develop policy and/or practice recommendations based on the findings.

 

As reported by the Public Health Agency of Canada, Aboriginal people are estimated to account for 7.5% of persons living with HIV in Canada at the end of 2005 and 9% of all new HIV infections in 2005. This shows an estimated overall infection rate in Aboriginal persons that is nearly 3 times higher than among non-Aboriginals. The fact that 61% of communities identify alcohol use as a problem exacerbates the concern. While research findings regarding the impact of alcohol on antiretroviral therapies are inconsistent, APHAs have reported that perceptions by health care professionals who assume a predilection to addiction and drug abuse based on ethnicity results in avoidance of health services, except in extreme circumstances. The skills and cultural competence of health care providers influence access to care. Jackson & Reimer, 2005 found prejudice to be prevalent among primary health care providers where APHAs are concerned. Recommendations by APHA participants point directly to ways in which access to and delivery of services can be improved. This team is therefore proposing to paint a clearer picture regarding the relationship between alcohol use and access to health care service delivery by APHAs. DVD Handout_CAAN Video_Draft

 

Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network Research Project Team (2013).  The Experiences of Being Peer Research Associates & Key Research Findings. Our team produced this 13 minute video to relay both our community-based research process and findings. The video can be viewed at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=9g37mIvNI-w

 

Individual Videos of the 9 Key Research Findings:
Research Finding 1 – Impact of Alcohol
Research Finding 2 – The Role of Alcohol in Becoming Positive
Research Finding 3 – Misperceptions of Drunkeness
Research Finding 4 – Using Alcohol and Being HIV Positive
Research Finding 5 – Alcohol and HIV Treatment
Research Finding 6 – Experiences with Service Providers
Research Finding 7 – Service Provider Organizational Policies
Research Finding 8 – Service Provider Experiences
Research Finding 9 – Discrimination

 

Memory Sticks Available!

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OUTCOMES: R. Masching, C. Dell, , J.P. Egan, N. Gros-Louis McHugh, D. Lee, (late), T. Prentice, L. Storm, Elder C. Thomas, A. McGee, H. Dale-Harris. 2014. “The Complexities of Accessing Care and Treatment: Understanding Alcohol Use by Aboriginal Persons Living with HIV and AIDS”. Canadian Journal of Aboriginal Community-Based HIV/AIDS Research. 6, pp. 70-94.

Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network. (2013). Alcohol Use by Aboriginal Persons Living with HIV and its Association with Access to Care and Treatment. Vancouver: Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network.

Réseau canadien autochtone du sida. (2013). La consummation d’alcool chez les Autochtones vivant avec le VIH et al sida, et son lien avec l’accès aux soins et aux traitements. Vancouver: Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network.

Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network. (2013). Alcohol Use by Aboriginal Persons Living with HIV and AIDS and its Association with Access to Care and Treatment. In Brief: Highlights of Policy and Practice Implications. Vancouver: Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network.

Réseau canadien autochtone du sida. (2013). La consommation d’alcool chez les Autochtones vivant avec le VIH et le sida, et son lien avec l’accès aux soins et aux traitements. Résumé: Politiques et pratiques en recherche : les grandes lignes d’un engagement. Vancouver : Réseau canadien autochtone du sida.

Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network. (2013). Technical Report: Alcohol Use by Aboriginal Persons Living with HIV and its Association with Access to Care and Treatment. Vancouver: Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network.  Available soon!

Réseau canadien autochtone du sida. (2013). Report Technique: La consummation d’alcool chez les Autochtones vivant avec le VIH et al sida, et son lien avec l’accès aux soins et aux traitements. Vancouver : Réseau canadien autochtone du sida.  Available soon!

R Masching, C. Dell, J. Egan, N. Gros-Louis, H. Harris, D. Lee, R. Masching, T. Prentice, L. Storm, C. Thomas, A. McGee, H. Dale-Harris. 2012. “Beyond the Bottle: Alcohol Use by Aboriginal Persons Living with HIV and its Association with Access to Care and Treatment”. AIDS 2012, Washington, DC, USA. Available here.

A. Campbell, C. Dell, J. Egan, N. Gros-Louis, H. Harris, D. Lee, R. Masching, T. Prentice, L. Storm. 2012. “ Alcohol Use by Aboriginal Persons Living with HIV/AIDS and its Association with Access to Care and Treatment”. ‘No Harm in Trying’ Atlantic Harm Reduction Conference, Halifax, NS.

A. Campbell, C. Dell, J. Egan, N. Gros-Louis, H. Harris, D. Lee, R. Masching, T. Prentice, L. Storm. 2011. “Alcohol Use by Aboriginal Persons Living with HIV/AIDS and its Association with Access to Care and Treatment”. Wise Practices III HIV/AIDS Research Conference, Halifax, NS.

2011. Community Fact Sheet. CAAN: Halifax.

A. Campbell, J. Egan, C. Dell, N. Gros-Louis, H. Harris, D. Lee, R. Masching, T. Prentice, L. Storm. 2011. “Alcohol Use, Safety and Best Practices in Ensuring HIV Care for Aboriginal People”. Canadian Association for HIV Research Conference, Toronto, ON.  Available here.

A. Campbell, C. Dell, J. Egan, N. Gros-Louis, H. Harris, D. Lee, R. Masching, T. Prentice, L. Storm. 2011. “Alcohol Use by Aboriginal Persons Living with HIV/AIDS and its Association with Access to Care and Treatment”. Ontario HIV Treatment Network Research Conference, Toronto, ON.

R. Masching, C. Dell,  L. Storm, D. Lee, J. Egan, T. Prentice, H. Dale-Harris, A. McGee. 2010. Community Fact Sheet: Alcohol Use by Aboriginal Persons Living with HIV/AIDS and its Association with Access to Care and Treatment. British Columbia: Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network.

R. Jackson, R. Masching, T. Prentice, C. Dell, A. Campbell. 2010. “Decolonizing Methodologies Across Cultures: Building Indigenous and Allied Researcher Capacity”. INIHKD Conference, Washington, DC.

C. Dell and R. Masching. 2010. “Alcohol Use by Aboriginal Peoples Living with HIV/AIDS and its Association with Access to Care and Treatment”. Canadian Conference on HIV/AIDS Research, Saskatoon, SK.

A. Campbell, J. Egan, C. Dell, N. Gros-Louis, H. Harris, D. Lee, R. Masching, T. Prentice, L. Storm. 2010. “Making it Work: Operationalizing Principles of Ethical Research in Aboriginal Communities in the Context of Existing Institutional Structures”. AIDS 2010,  Vienna, Austria.  Available here.